Cross dating in archaeology

The science that uses tree rings to date earth surface processes that created, altered, or shaped the landscape.Example: analyzing changes in tree growth patterns via tree rings to date a series of landslide events.A layer of wood cells produced by a tree or shrub in one year, usually consisting of thin-walled cells formed early in the growing season (called earlywood) and thicker-walled cells produced later in the growing season (called latewood).The beginning of earlywood formation and the end of the latewood formation form one annual ring, which usually extends around the entire circumference of the tree.

Example: analyzing ring widths of trees to determine how much rainfall fell per year long before weather records were kept.

Usually this process tries to remove the growth trends due to normal physiological aging processes and changes in the surrounding forest community.

An auger-like instrument with a hollow shaft that is screwed into the trunk of a tree, and from which an increment core (or tree core) is extracted using an extractor (a long spoon inserted into the shaft that pulls out the tree core).

These instruments are quite expensive, normally ranging from 0 to 0.

NOTE TO READERS You may notice that the principles below represent a major change in the way we approach dendrochronology.This exercise is designed to introduce you to basic techniques used in determining the age of archaeological materials and sites.

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